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02.09.20 in Everything

Suspense and sequins this autumn

With autumn just around the corner, before you know it we’ll be snuggled up on the sofa as the weather closes […]

04.08.20 in Everything

Cricket anyone?

It’s August, and that means there’s a bank holiday! This particular holiday was introduced in 1871 and was originally intended to […]

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02.07.20 in Everything

Love it or loathe it, sport is returning to our small screens

Despite a number of anticipated events being postponed to later in the year and a few, such as the Olympics and […]

15.06.20 in Everything

What have we been watching?

In the past few months, many of us have been watching a bit more TV than normal. Excluding subscription services, it […]

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13.02.20 in Everything

This year we can enjoy 366 days of TV!

29 February 2020 is a leap year – that’s an extra day in this year’s calendar. A leap year occurs every […]

05.12.19 in Everything

It’s time to deck the halls

The beginning of December heralded the start of winter. Although the temperatures may be dropping, spirits are rising as a certain […]

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                    [post_content] => With autumn just around the corner, before you know it we’ll be snuggled up on the sofa as the weather closes in. We’ve taken a look at what shows will be on our small screens in the coming months - here’s a taster of some exciting new shows that are on the schedule as well as the return of some favourites.

Roadkill, BBC

A new four-part drama, sees the public and private life of (fictional) Conservative politician, Peter Laurence, falling apart. As the personal revelations spiral, he is shamelessly untroubled by guilt or remorse but with enemies close to home, can he out-run his own secrets? 

All Creatures Great and Small, Channel 5

Based on the memoirs of rural Yorkshire vet James Herriot, All Creatures Great and Small is making a welcome return to our screens. With a brand-new cast, the series follows the trials and misadventures of the staff of a country veterinary office in 1940's Yorkshire.

His Dark Materials, BBC

The second season of His Dark Materials moves on to the events of the second novel, The Subtle Knife, and the dual stories of Lyra Silvertongue and Will Parry are set to collide in a parallel universe as they pursue the truth about Dust.

The Singapore Grip, ITV

Adapted from J.G. Farrell’s 1978 novel, The Singapore Grip is set during the Second World War. This six-part drama tells the story of a prosperous British family and a powerful rubber business in Singapore at the time of the Japanese invasion.

Ghosts, BBC

The comedy centres around a young couple, Alison and Mike, who have inherited a decrepit country manor – but when they move in with big renovation plans, they discover a collection of spirits already living there. And the ghosts have plans of their own.

The Sister, ITV

The Sister, is a suspenseful new murder mystery. A man with a terrible secret who is trying to escape the (literal) ghosts of his past. The drama promises suspense, ghosts, murder and love. Intriguing. 

And what of the usual autumn reality series? Strictly Comes Dancing returns on October 24 and X-Factor is taking a break this autumn but promises to return next year.

If it’s an edge of the seat thriller, comedy ghosts or sequins and glitter that take your viewing fancy, the autumn schedule certainly has something for everyone.

Whatever you’re watching if you notice TV interference, there’s a small chance it may be due to 4G signals. We’re here to help – contact us on 0808 13 13 800 (free from UK landlines and mobiles).

At the time of writing, no broadcast dates were available. Strictly Comes Dancing air date courtesy of Radio Times.
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                    [post_content] => It’s August, and that means there’s a bank holiday! This particular holiday was introduced in 1871 and was originally intended to give bank employees the opportunity to participate in and attend cricket matches. 

Why are they called bank holidays? It was liberal politician and banker Sir John Lubbock who authored the Bank Holidays Act of 1871, which bought these public holidays into effect. Initially, there were four days known as St Lubbock’s Days. 

Why cricket you may be wondering? It was rumoured that Sir John Lubbock was so keen on cricket he chose the bank holiday dates to fall on the days when village matches were played in his home county! 

The August bank holiday was moved to the last Monday in August for England, Wales and Northern Ireland under the Banking and Financial Dealings Act of 1971. This was because it clashed with the traditional two week shut down that many companies undertook in the summer. In Scotland, it remains to be the first Monday in August.

If you are planning to watch some TV instead of playing cricket over the bank holiday weekend and notice TV interference, there’s a small chance it may be due to 4G signals. We’re here to help – contact us on 0808 13 13 800 (free from UK landlines and mobiles).
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                    [post_content] => Despite a number of anticipated events being postponed to later in the year and a few, such as the Olympics and Euro2020 have moved to next year, the sporting calendar is starting to see the return of many favourites. While some sports are resuming their season, some are just starting. It’s going to be an exciting summer and here are a few things we’ll be watching.

The beautiful game

The Premier League restarted its season in June and some of the remaining matches are being shown on the BBC or broadcast free to air on Sky Pick. The FA cup semi -finals will be played on 18 and 19 July and the final, normally a May highlight, is scheduled for 1 August. We’ve got our sofa space reserved already!

Laying down the rubber

It’s go, go, go for Formula 1 with the first races of the 2020 season taking place this month. There are three races in July: two in Austria and one Hungary. We can’t wait to watch the highlights on Channel 4. The last weekend of July sees the British Grand Prix; a highlight of the racing calendar (not that we’re biased in any way).

Two for the price of one

The Derby and Oaks traditionally take place on the first Friday and Saturday in June respectively, however this year they will be combined and run on a single day - 4 July. Although the event takes place without the usual spectators, there’s no reason not to watch the race in your finest millinery creation. The race is on ITV 1.

I don’t like cricket, I love it!

Highlights from every Test and One Day International this summer will be shown on BBC Two from July, marking the first time Test match cricket has been broadcast on BBC TV in over twenty years. We may not be able to be at the ground but we’ll certainly be creating our own atmosphere for the upcoming England v West Indies match.

Whether you’re cheering Hamilton on to a victory, disagreeing with the umpire or wondering who is the dark horse, it’s good to be back. If you have noticed new TV interference (we promise, it’s not goal line technology) – there’s a small chance it may be due to 4G signals. We’re here to help – contact us on 0808 13 13 800 (free from UK landlines and mobiles).

Note: all events and dates correct at the time of writing

 
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                    [post_content] => In the past few months, many of us have been watching a bit more TV than normal. Excluding subscription services, it seems most of us have been adding a few extra hours of TV viewing during the week. According to the Broadcasters’ Audience Research Board (BARB), the number of hours we spent watching TV increased by 35% in April and 11% in May, when compared to the same months in previous years.

Along with our favourite soaps and dramas, there have been some other programmes lots of us have been tuning into. Here’s a short round up.

Can you fix it?

If it’s broken, the team at The Repair Shop can save it. 6.7 million of us have been watching these skilled and caring craftspeople rescue and restore sentimental objects such as music boxes, vases and clocks, proving that anything can be fixed up to be as good as new again – or even better!

Travel smart

No smartphones, no credit cards and no access to the internet. Already sounds like a challenge but add to that no air travel, how would five pairs of travellers get from Mexico City to Argentina? The second Race Across the World was an epic contest that saw an extra million of us tune into this series. Five pairs of travellers travelled 25,000 km in two months and, as two pairs raced to the finish line, the winners pipped the other pair by seconds!

Coughing Major

Remember the story of an Army Major from Wiltshire accused of tricking his way into winning £1 million on the TV show Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? The drama Quiz was a reconstruction of the programme and the trial which led to his conviction. 5.3M of us were gripped.

Whatever you’ve been watching in the past few months, we hope your viewing has been free of interference. If you have noticed new TV interference – there’s a small chance it may be due to 4G signals. We’re here to help – contact us on 0808 13 13 800 (free from UK landlines and mobiles).
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                    [post_content] => 29 February 2020 is a leap year – that’s an extra day in this year’s calendar.

A leap year occurs every four years and by adding an extra day, it keeps our calendar aligned with the astronomical seasons. Every year the calendar is out of sync by 5 hours, 48 minutes, and 45 seconds. Without leap days, after 100 years the difference would be 25 days!

Why is it called a ‘leap year’? A fixed date in the Gregorian calendar normally advances one day of the week from one year to the next. However, the day of the week in the 12 months following the leap day will advance two days due to the extra day. It’s likely the name came from this "leaping over" one of the days in the week. For example, if your birthday is on 1 December and it fell on a Friday in 2019, in 2020 it will leap over Saturday to fall on a Sunday.

Are you a ‘leapling’? Babies born on leap day are called ‘leaplings’. Doesn’t seem fair to celebrate your birthday only every four years!

And what of folklore? Leap Day was also known as “Ladies Day” or “Ladies’ Privilege,” as it was the one day when women were free to propose to men.

We’re happy to have an extra day! If you decide to spend the extra time watching your favourite TV programmes and notice new TV interference – there’s a small chance it may be due to 4G signals. We’re here to help – contact us on 0808 13 13 800 (free from UK landlines and mobiles).
                    [post_title] => This year we can enjoy 366 days of TV!
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                    [post_content] => The beginning of December heralded the start of winter. Although the temperatures may be dropping, spirits are rising as a certain holiday is almost upon us. Despite the fact many shops are lavishly decorated for the festive season in November, this weekend is the time many of us look to decorate our homes and almost 8 million of us will be buying a Christmas tree.

So how did the tradition of decorating a tree indoors start? Way before trees were bought indoors and decorated, trees outdoors were adorned with strips of coloured cloth each winter. It was believed when trees lost their leaves, the spirits living in the trees disappeared and, without tree spirits, it was thought the leaves would not grow again. So, the trees were decorated to encourage the spirits to return in spring.

The tradition of decorating evergreens inside at Christmas started around the beginning of the 1600s and in 1800, George III’s German-born wife, Charlotte, introduced a Christmas tree at a party she gave for children. The custom of decorated trees remained very much within the royal family until Queen Victoria’s marriage to Prince Albert. By 1841, the custom had become more widespread but only by the wealthier middle-class families. It wasn’t until the mid-1920s that Christmas trees starting appearing in more homes.

Although we now see decorated Christmas trees in stores from mid-November, traditionally Christmas trees were not put up and decorated until Christmas Eve or on the first day of Christmas -23 December. It’s considered back luck to have your Christmas tree up after Twelfth Night so most of them get taken down on 5 or 6 January.

If you’re planning to put up decorations this weekend, it may not be the singing reindeer that are causing new TV interference - there’s a small chance it may be due to 4G signals. We’re here to help – contact us on 0808 13 13 800 (free from UK landlines and mobiles).
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            [post_content] => With autumn just around the corner, before you know it we’ll be snuggled up on the sofa as the weather closes in. We’ve taken a look at what shows will be on our small screens in the coming months - here’s a taster of some exciting new shows that are on the schedule as well as the return of some favourites.

Roadkill, BBC

A new four-part drama, sees the public and private life of (fictional) Conservative politician, Peter Laurence, falling apart. As the personal revelations spiral, he is shamelessly untroubled by guilt or remorse but with enemies close to home, can he out-run his own secrets? 

All Creatures Great and Small, Channel 5

Based on the memoirs of rural Yorkshire vet James Herriot, All Creatures Great and Small is making a welcome return to our screens. With a brand-new cast, the series follows the trials and misadventures of the staff of a country veterinary office in 1940's Yorkshire.

His Dark Materials, BBC

The second season of His Dark Materials moves on to the events of the second novel, The Subtle Knife, and the dual stories of Lyra Silvertongue and Will Parry are set to collide in a parallel universe as they pursue the truth about Dust.

The Singapore Grip, ITV

Adapted from J.G. Farrell’s 1978 novel, The Singapore Grip is set during the Second World War. This six-part drama tells the story of a prosperous British family and a powerful rubber business in Singapore at the time of the Japanese invasion.

Ghosts, BBC

The comedy centres around a young couple, Alison and Mike, who have inherited a decrepit country manor – but when they move in with big renovation plans, they discover a collection of spirits already living there. And the ghosts have plans of their own.

The Sister, ITV

The Sister, is a suspenseful new murder mystery. A man with a terrible secret who is trying to escape the (literal) ghosts of his past. The drama promises suspense, ghosts, murder and love. Intriguing. 

And what of the usual autumn reality series? Strictly Comes Dancing returns on October 24 and X-Factor is taking a break this autumn but promises to return next year.

If it’s an edge of the seat thriller, comedy ghosts or sequins and glitter that take your viewing fancy, the autumn schedule certainly has something for everyone.

Whatever you’re watching if you notice TV interference, there’s a small chance it may be due to 4G signals. We’re here to help – contact us on 0808 13 13 800 (free from UK landlines and mobiles).

At the time of writing, no broadcast dates were available. Strictly Comes Dancing air date courtesy of Radio Times.
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