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22.02.21 in Everything

Drama free crime

To help get us through the last leg of winter, we’ve swapped the winter blues, for the police blues and are […]

29.01.21 in Everything

Celebrating 95 years of TV

John Logie Baird first demonstrated his new television machine to members of the Royal Institution in London in January 1926. Almost […]

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02.12.20 in Everything

Banana loaf anyone?

As 2020 comes to a close, we thought we would take a look at a few things that were a bit […]

03.11.20 in Everything

Stir Up Sunday

We have a rich and diverse culture of traditions and customs that are celebrated throughout the year. These include events such […]

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09.10.20 in Everything

Carving out some time for fun

Autumn is well and truly here. The leaves have turned stunning shades of red and orange, there’s a nip in the […]

02.09.20 in Everything

Suspense and sequins this autumn

With autumn just around the corner, before you know it we’ll be snuggled up on the sofa as the weather closes […]

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                    [post_content] => To help get us through the last leg of winter, we’ve swapped the winter blues, for the police blues and are enjoying some seriously good TV crime drama. We’re gripped by Marcella which, in this series, sees her with a new identity as she goes undercover to get to the truth behind the infamous Maguire family and we’re back in the seaside town of Morecambe for a new series of The Bay. This story focuses on a middle class family, the Marshbrooks, who suddenly find their comfortable lives shattered by a shocking event.  

And there’s more to come! Bloodlands, is a new four-part BBC series starting this Sunday. The series follows DCI Tom Brannick as he recognises the calling card of a serial killer from 20 years ago. Sounds intriguing. And two favourite London detectives are reunited in a chilling new series of Unforgotten. Detectives DCI Cassie Stuart and DI Sunny Khan investigate a body found in a scrapyard and the team believes the remains had been stored in a domestic freezer for 30 years. 

For the crime drama aficionados, there are dedicated Freeview channels showing classic crime drama programmes. On CBS Drama, you can catch episodes of CSI Miami, the florida based forensic investigators who use cutting-edge scientific methods and old-fashioned police work to solve crimes; while on CBS Justice you can follow the quirky Scorpion team as they solve worldwide crises. If you prefer classic UK drama head to Drama where you can see the Spooks team work around the clock to safeguard and the nation. 

Whatever you are watching, don’t let TV interference spoil your viewing. If you have noticed new interference, it might be caused by new 4G signals that have activated in your area. We’re here to help – contact us on 0808 13 13 800 (free from UK landlines and mobiles).
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                    [post_content] => John Logie Baird first demonstrated his new television machine to members of the Royal Institution in London in January 1926. Almost 100 years later and, according to TV Licencing, 95% of households own a TV set and watching TV is an integral part of many of our lives. Whether it’s catching up on the latest news, getting involved with the soaps, becoming armchair detectives or simply getting swept away with a period drama, we love watching TV.

During the last 12 months, perhaps unsurprisingly, we’ve watched TV a bit more than in previous years. According to Broadcasters' Audience Research Board (BARB), we watched an extra 34 minutes of TV every day. That trend has continued into January and maybe some of those extra minutes have been spent watching a couple of gripping new mini series that came to our small screens this month - The Pembrokeshire Murders and Finding Alice. These new shows topped the TV ratings and were followed by firm favourite Death in Paradise. Rounding up the top five most watched shows were The Masked Singer and a mainstay of British TV, Coronation Street.

Thanks to Mr Baird’s great invention, TV broadcasts have presented us with opportunities to be witness historical moments such as the Apollo 11 moon landing; to be spectators at amazing sporting events - who could forget Super Saturday at the 2012 Olympics; and to marvel at nature’s truly amazing and stunning wildlife, especially that below the water courtesy of Blue Planet. Mr Baird would be truly proud of his invention.

Whatever you are watching, don’t let TV interference spoil your viewing. If you have noticed new interference, it might be caused by new 4G signals that have activated in your area. We’re here to help – contact us on 0808 13 13 800 (free from UK landlines and mobiles).
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                    [post_content] => As 2020 comes to a close, we thought we would take a look at a few things that were a bit different in the world of TV during this very unusual year.

All of us watched more TV. According to Ofcom’s Media Nations Report 2020, in April, when the UK was in full lockdown, we spent on average an estimated six hours 25 minutes per person per day watching TV, an hour and a half more than the average figure for 2019. 

According to the Broadcasters' Audience Research Board (BARB), the Prime Ministerial statement on 10 May was by far the most-watched single channel broadcast with an average audience of 18.7m, beating the address by the Queen on 5 April that attracted 14m people. We didn’t just watch news programmes though, 10.8m of us tuned into Britain’s Got Talent and 10.6m watched Ant and Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway.*

Our favourite soaps took a break during the summer but we were lucky enough to enjoy some sport not normally available on free to air TV including football’s Premier League and Test and One Day Cricket Internationals. As we moved into autumn, the schedule started to look a little more familiar with the seasonal return of Strictly Come Dancing and I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out Of Here - the latter, according to Broadcast Magazine, is the most watched TV show so far this year - we guess everyone needs a bit of escapism.

When not watching the TV, it seems we took up new hobbies. According to a report based on Google Trends’ search data earlier this year, the most popular hobby based searches included finding ways to learn a new language, fitness training, home improvements, taking up yoga, baking (who didn’t make a banana loaf or attempt sourdough?) and turning our hands to gardening. 

Eating in has become the new going out. Food delivery and home cooking was back on the menu and according to Kantar research, not only are we snacking 50% more often than before lockdown, but the research also suggests that the long-term trend away from eating desserts has reversed this year. Apple crumble anyone?

We’ve also been getting to grips with new technology. Learning how to use video conferencing, grappling with the mute button and making sure we look presentable - well, at least on the top half! We now understand what a QR code is and are still amazed at how those squiggly lines translate into the menu.

Whether you’ve been knitting, cooking, fixing that wonky shelf or learning a new language, we hope your TV watching has remained free of interference. If you have noticed new TV interference – there’s a small chance it may be due to 4G signals. We’re here to help – contact us on 0808 13 13 800 (free from UK landlines and mobiles).  

*Viewing figures from 15 March-12 July 2020
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                    [post_content] => We have a rich and diverse culture of traditions and customs that are celebrated throughout the year. These include events such as Halloween and bonfire night, and while some are based on folklore, legend and superstitions, we have a few that are, quite frankly, just a little bizarre. But we wouldn’t want it any other way.

One special event that takes place in November is Stir Up Sunday. This year it falls on 22 November. Dating back to Victorian times, Stir Up Sunday is the day to prepare the Christmas pudding. Traditionally, families gather together on this last Sunday before Advent, and take a turn in stirring the mixture, making a wish as they do so. 

Sometimes known as figgy or plum pudding, Christmas pudding is thought to have been introduced to Britain by Prince Albert, consort of Queen Victoria, although some historians think a version of the pudding was actually introduced from Germany by George I in 1714.

The pudding usually includes dried fruit, prunes and dates, candied peel, and mixed spice although earlier recipes show it would have included meat. Silver coins are sometimes added to the mixture (only if it’s home made though) and, if you are lucky enough to find one on Christmas Day, it’s said you will enjoy health, wealth and happiness in the coming year. 

Stirring your pudding or making wishes won’t cause TV interference but there is a small chance it may be due to 4G signals. We’re here to help – contact us on 0808 13 13 800 (free from UK landlines and mobiles).
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                    [post_content] => Autumn is well and truly here. The leaves have turned stunning shades of red and orange, there’s a nip in the air and our thoughts are turning to the end of month when things get spooky with Halloween. Carving scary faces into pumpkins and illuminating them from the inside has become something of a Halloween tradition and we were curious as to how this came about.

According to Irish folklore, Jack (also referred to as Stingy Jack) was a blacksmith - a somewhat foul-mouthed drunk and disreputable miser by all accounts - who had tricked the devil on several occasions. 

When Jack died, he was denied entrance into both heaven and hell. However, when the devil turned him away, he gave Jack a burning ember. Jack hollowed out a turnip to carry the ember and give him light. And so, the story was remembered each year by carving scary faces on turnips and placing a burning piece of coal inside. Known as jack-o’-lanterns, Irish immigrants settling in the US, discovered that pumpkins were more readily available and made better jack-o'-lanterns than turnips. Eventually, candles replaced the burning coals and today, it’s more likely to be a battery-operated candle.

But how did jack-o’-lanterns become associated with Halloween? Halloween is based on the Celtic festival Samhain, a celebration in ancient Britain and Ireland that marked the end of summer and the beginning of the new year on 1 November. It was believed that during Samhain the souls of those who had died that year traveled to the otherworld and that other souls would return to visit their homes.

In the 8th century CE, the Roman Catholic Church moved All Saints’ Day, a day celebrating the church’s saints, to 1 November. This meant that All Hallows’ Eve (or Halloween) fell on 31 October. Traditions from Samhain remained, such as wearing disguises to hide yourself from the souls wandering around your home. The folklore about Stingy Jack was quickly incorporated into Halloween, and we’ve been carving pumpkins - or turnips - ever since.

This Halloween, if you notice TV interference, it’s unlikely to be Jack or a returning soul - but there is a small chance it may be due to 4G signals. We’re here to help – contact us on 0808 13 13 800 (free from UK landlines and mobiles).
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                    [post_content] => With autumn just around the corner, before you know it we’ll be snuggled up on the sofa as the weather closes in. We’ve taken a look at what shows will be on our small screens in the coming months - here’s a taster of some exciting new shows that are on the schedule as well as the return of some favourites.

Roadkill, BBC

A new four-part drama, sees the public and private life of (fictional) Conservative politician, Peter Laurence, falling apart. As the personal revelations spiral, he is shamelessly untroubled by guilt or remorse but with enemies close to home, can he out-run his own secrets? 

All Creatures Great and Small, Channel 5

Based on the memoirs of rural Yorkshire vet James Herriot, All Creatures Great and Small is making a welcome return to our screens. With a brand-new cast, the series follows the trials and misadventures of the staff of a country veterinary office in 1940's Yorkshire.

His Dark Materials, BBC

The second season of His Dark Materials moves on to the events of the second novel, The Subtle Knife, and the dual stories of Lyra Silvertongue and Will Parry are set to collide in a parallel universe as they pursue the truth about Dust.

The Singapore Grip, ITV

Adapted from J.G. Farrell’s 1978 novel, The Singapore Grip is set during the Second World War. This six-part drama tells the story of a prosperous British family and a powerful rubber business in Singapore at the time of the Japanese invasion.

Ghosts, BBC

The comedy centres around a young couple, Alison and Mike, who have inherited a decrepit country manor – but when they move in with big renovation plans, they discover a collection of spirits already living there. And the ghosts have plans of their own.

The Sister, ITV

The Sister, is a suspenseful new murder mystery. A man with a terrible secret who is trying to escape the (literal) ghosts of his past. The drama promises suspense, ghosts, murder and love. Intriguing. 

And what of the usual autumn reality series? Strictly Comes Dancing returns on October 24 and X-Factor is taking a break this autumn but promises to return next year.

If it’s an edge of the seat thriller, comedy ghosts or sequins and glitter that take your viewing fancy, the autumn schedule certainly has something for everyone.

Whatever you’re watching if you notice TV interference, there’s a small chance it may be due to 4G signals. We’re here to help – contact us on 0808 13 13 800 (free from UK landlines and mobiles).

At the time of writing, no broadcast dates were available. Strictly Comes Dancing air date courtesy of Radio Times.
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            [post_content] => To help get us through the last leg of winter, we’ve swapped the winter blues, for the police blues and are enjoying some seriously good TV crime drama. We’re gripped by Marcella which, in this series, sees her with a new identity as she goes undercover to get to the truth behind the infamous Maguire family and we’re back in the seaside town of Morecambe for a new series of The Bay. This story focuses on a middle class family, the Marshbrooks, who suddenly find their comfortable lives shattered by a shocking event.  

And there’s more to come! Bloodlands, is a new four-part BBC series starting this Sunday. The series follows DCI Tom Brannick as he recognises the calling card of a serial killer from 20 years ago. Sounds intriguing. And two favourite London detectives are reunited in a chilling new series of Unforgotten. Detectives DCI Cassie Stuart and DI Sunny Khan investigate a body found in a scrapyard and the team believes the remains had been stored in a domestic freezer for 30 years. 

For the crime drama aficionados, there are dedicated Freeview channels showing classic crime drama programmes. On CBS Drama, you can catch episodes of CSI Miami, the florida based forensic investigators who use cutting-edge scientific methods and old-fashioned police work to solve crimes; while on CBS Justice you can follow the quirky Scorpion team as they solve worldwide crises. If you prefer classic UK drama head to Drama where you can see the Spooks team work around the clock to safeguard and the nation. 

Whatever you are watching, don’t let TV interference spoil your viewing. If you have noticed new interference, it might be caused by new 4G signals that have activated in your area. We’re here to help – contact us on 0808 13 13 800 (free from UK landlines and mobiles).
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